Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (CBT)

CBT looks at our thoughts, feelings and behaviours. CBT therapists understand that by changing the way we think and act in the here-and-now, we can affect the way we feel. CBT also looks at people longitudinally: exploring the origin of beliefs, rules and assumptions which shape an individual's world-view. CBT can be model-driven for a range of disorders, but cases are also be formulated (conceptualized) individually.


Formulation worksheets

Core-Belief-Driven CBT Formulation Worksheet Belief-Driven CBT Formulation

CBT Cross-Sectional Formulation Worksheet Cross Sectional CBT Formulation

CBT Friendly Formulation Worksheet Friendly Formulation

Click to download Jacqueline Persons-Style Case Formulation

Judith Beck Formulation Worksheet Judith Beck-Style Case Formulation

Longitudinal Formulation 1 Longitudinal Formulation

Longitudinal Formulation 2 Longitudinal Formulation 2

Schema Activation Formulation Schema Activation Formulation

Vicious Flower Formulation Vicious Flower Formulation


Cognitive restructuring

Behavioural Experiment Behavioural Experiment Planning Worksheet

CBT Thought Record Worksheet CBT Thought Record

Decatastrophising worksheet Decatastrophising Worksheet

Modifying Rules And Assumptions Modifying Rules And Assumptions

Positive Belief Record Positive Belief Record

Simple Thought Record Simple Thought Record

Theory A Theory B Theory A / Theory B
Hypothesis A / Hypothesis B
Dual Model Strategy

What If...? What If ... ? Worksheet


Information sheets & useful tools

CBT Core Belief Magnet Metaphor Core Belief Magnet Metaphor

How Breathing Affects Feelings How Breathing Affects Feelings

Safety Behaviours Safety Behaviours

Threat system Threat System / Fight or Flight

Unhelpful Thinking Styles Unhelpful Thinking Styles

What Is CBT? What Is Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT)?

What Is Rumination? What Is Rumination?

Self Practice Record Form (CBT Homework Worksheet) Self-Practice Record Form (CBT Homework Worksheet)

Therapy Blueprint Therapy Blueprint


Assessment

Formulation

Intervention

Articles on CBT

There are a series of articles by Chris Williams and Anne Garland about their '5 areas approach' to CBT. This a branded form of CBT which aims to simplify some of the terminology to make it more accessible. It links in with the 'Living life to the full' resources. Some of the materials are available for free:


 

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Acknowledgements/References: PsychologyTools tries as far as possible to reference all sources of original work, and will gratefully welcome any corrections.
 
© 2008-2014 Matthew Whalley